Effective. Professional. Experienced.

The 20.2-acre O’Neill/Mullin site is a commercial development in the southern end of Napa County. Though the relatively new Corps regulations lean heavily towards mitigating project impacts at mitigation banks, on-site restoration can still work under certain circumstances.  However, the Corps may look at these projects with increased scrutiny compared to the past. We developed a mitigation plan for the site and worked with the Corps staff to eliminate any potential concerns as a result of that increased scrutiny.  The resulting plan was one that both the client and Corps staff approved and resulted in a smooth permitting process. 

The Lower Laguna Creek project was completed for Sacramento County and required permits or other approvals from the US Army Corps of Engineers, US Fish and Wildlife Service, CA Regional Water Quality Control Board, and CA Department of Fish and Wildlife. The project was both large and complex, primarily involving designing and constructing a new flood control project for more than 300 acres of land in southern Sacramento that included creeks, vernal pools and seasonal marshes. The major steps in completing the permit approvals were accurately defining the boundaries of the many wetlands and our work with Gill Water Resources to design a flood bypass channel that also accommodated the project mitigation. This became one of the largest wetland fill permits issued by the Sacramento District of the Corps. 

The Torian project site was a mix of post-industrial landfills and excavations and many of the latter hosted seasonal wetlands. Working with historic aerial photographs, soils analyses, and hydrology modeling, we demonstrated that the wetlands were limited to a relatively discrete part of the site, ending several years of disputes over the wetland boundaries. As with other projects on the Bay margins, permitting was complex, requiring approvals from the US Army Corps of Engineers, US Fish and Wildlife Service, US National Marine Fisheries Service, SF Bay Conservation and Development Commission, and the CA Regional Water Quality Control Board.  This was one of the largest wetland fill permits issued by the San Francisco District of the Corps in the past two decades.